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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of Robbins Cell Surface Carbohydrates and Biological Recognition found in the catalog.

Robbins Cell Surface Carbohydrates and Biological Recognition

VT ROBBINS

Robbins Cell Surface Carbohydrates and Biological Recognition

by VT ROBBINS

  • 172 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by John Wiley & Sons Inc .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Clinical & Internal Medicine

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages690
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10330398M
    ISBN 100471564575
    ISBN 109780471564577

      Lectins are proteins that recognize and bind specific carbohydrates found on the surfaces of cells. They play a role in interactions and communication between cells typically for recognition. Carbohydrates on the surface of one cell bind to the binding sites of lectins on the surface of another cell. The structure and function of cells are critically dependent on membranes, which not only separate the interior of the cell from its environment but also define the internal compartments of eukaryotic cells, including the nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles. The formation of biological membranes is based on the properties of lipids, and all cell membranes share a common structural organization.

    • Biological molecules are polymers, Carbohydrates? All cells use glucose (monosaccharide) as an energy source. “fuel” of the living world lipids on cell surfaces and act as recognition signals. Human blood groups get specificity from oligosaccharide chains.   Recent biochemical and genetic evidence has shown that carbohydrate-binding protein (CBP) is intimately involved in the cell-cell cohesion process. We have isolated a cell-surface-associated receptor molecule for CBP by affinity chromatography. The receptor has a molecular weight of 80, daltons.

    The cell membrane (also known as the plasma membrane (PM) or cytoplasmic membrane, and historically referred to as the plasmalemma) is a biological membrane that separates the interior of all cells from the outside environment (the extracellular space) which protects the cell from its environment. The cell membrane consists of a lipid bilayer, including cholesterols (a lipid component) that. Glycan-binding sites of cell-surface receptors like Siglecs can be masked by cognate glycans on the same cell surface, making them unavailable for recognition of external ligands. On the other hand, some glycans can act as “biological masks,” preventing recognition of underlying residues (e.g., sialic acids can mask recognition of.


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Robbins Cell Surface Carbohydrates and Biological Recognition by VT ROBBINS Download PDF EPUB FB2

The cell is tricked by the mimicry of the virus coat molecules, and the virus is able to enter the cell. Other recognition sites on the virus’s surface interact with the human immune system, prompting the body to produce antibodies.

Antibodies are made in response to the antigens (or proteins associated with invasive pathogens). Membrane carbohydrates perform two main functions: participate in cell recognition and adhesion, either cell-cell signaling or cell-pathogen interactions, and they have a structural role as a physical barrier.

Blood groups are determined by cell surface carbohydrates of erythrocytes, and they also have the ability to trigger immunological. Advances in glycobiology demonstrated that GAGs, mostly as cell surface-bound polysaccharides, appear to be involved in nearly all levels of cell biology and pathogenesis.

It was not surprising, therefore, that by mid s, research in carbohydrates was considered as one of the hottest topics. Get this from a library. Cell surface carbohydrates and biological recognition: proceedings of the ICN-UCLA symposium held at Keystone, Colorado, February [Vincent T Marchesi; ICN Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; University of California, Los Angeles.;].

Cell surface carbohydrates present information-rich binding sites for other molecules and act as "receptors" for biological agents as diverse as viruses, bacteria, toxins, and other cells.

This is illustrated well by studying the properties of circulating immune cells. The cells must often pass through the walls of capillaries as they hone in on a site of infection.

Biological significance/functions of carbohydrates: Ø Source of energy: Carbohydrates are the primary source of energy. They are the food reserve (energy store molecules) in microbes, animals and plants. Ø Source of C, H, and O: Carbohydrates also act as the source of C, H and O in the cells for the synthesis of other macro molecules.

Abstract. ANIMAL CELL PLASMA MEMBRANES CONTAIN ASYMMETRICALLY-DISTRIBUTED glycoproteins and glycolipids which extend their carbohydrate-bearing portions directly into the extracellular environment, and there is currently a great deal of interest in the possible involvement of such molecules in the many aspects of cell recognition.

The cell membranes of bacteria, fungi and. Since surface carbohydrates do mediate cellular recognition, cancer-related changes in these mole- cules could be responsible for the breakdown of intercellular control mechanisms.

Fucosylated cell surface carbohydrates have been implicated in a wide variety of recognition. Sialic acid-containing structures play vital roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes in vertebrates, such as cellular recognition and communication.

2 They are also believed to be important virulence factors in bacteria, used by bacteria to mimic sialylated host cell surface carbohydrate structures to evade detection and attacking by the immune defense. Role of carbohydrates in protein secretion and turnover: effects of tunicamycin on the major cell surface glycoprotein of chick embryo fibroblasts.

Cell. Mar; 13 (3)– Yamada KM, Olden K, Pastan I. Transformation-sensitive cell surface protein: isolation, characterization, and.

Oligosaccharides—Their synthesis and biological roles. Oxford University Press, United Kingdom. Crocker P.R., ed. Mammalian carbohydrate recognition systems. Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation Springer-Verlag, Berlin. Wu A.M. The molecular immunology of complex carbohydrates—2.

Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers. The reasons for believing that complex carbohydrates on cell surfaces play important roles in controlling cell division and cellular recognition are that the structure, composition, and organization of these components change in association with “contact inhibition” (Hakomori, ; Robbins and Macpherson, ; Sakiyama et al., Albersheim P.

et al. () Structure and Function of Complex Carbohydrates Active in Regulating the Interactions of Plants and Their Pests. In: Loewus F.A., Ryan C.A. (eds) The Phytochemistry of Cell Recognition and Cell Surface Interactions.

Recent Advances in Phytochemistry (Proceedings of the Phytochemical Society of North America), vol Marchesi VT, Ginsburg V, Robbins PW, Fox CF () Cell surface carbohydrates and biological recognition. Liss, New York Google Scholar McNeil M, Darvill AG, Albersheim P () Plant Physiol – PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar.

Plant and fungal cells have cell walls made from carbohydrates. These cell walls provide protection and support for the cell and the whole organism. Carbohydrates are also involved in cell-cell recognition. Cells have carbohydrates on the external surface of their cell membranes that act as receptors.

The receptors may interact with the. Cell surface carbohydrates play important roles in cell recognition mechanisms. Recently, we provided evidence that particle selection by suspension-feeding bivalves can be mediated by interactions between carbohydrates associated with the particle surface and lectins present in mucus covering bivalve feeding organs.

In this study, we used lectins tagged with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. Carbohydrates are the third major component of plasma membranes. They are always found on the exterior surface of cells and are bound either to proteins (forming glycoproteins) or to lipids (forming glycolipids).

These carbohydrate chains may consist of 2–60 monosaccharide units and can be either straight or branched. Along with peripheral proteins, carbohydrates form specialized sites on the cell surface that allow cells to recognize each other.

These sites have unique patterns that allow for cell recognition, much the way that the facial features unique to each person allow individuals to recognize him or her. If ectomycorrhizal formation and specificity is mediated by complementary recognition factors, e.g. cell wall surface molecules (Albersheim and Anderson-Prouty, ; Sequeira, ) then the.

polymers lubricate skeletal joints and participate in recognition and adhesion between cells. on a cell surface, is an important carbohydrate in biology. In some cases, cell-surface lectins bind particular glycoproteins (e.g., asialoglycoproteins), whereas in other cases the carbohydrates of cell surface glycoproteins or glycolipids serve as sites of attachment for biologically active molecules that themselves are lectins (e.g.

carbohydrate-specific bacterial and plant toxins, or galectins). The cell is tricked by the mimicry of the virus coat molecules, and the virus is able to enter the cell. Other recognition sites on the virus’s surface interact with the human immune system, prompting the body to produce antibodies.

Antibodies are made in response to the antigens (or proteins associated with invasive pathogens). The chapter discusses the cell surface carbohydrates in relation to receptor activity. It discusses the interaction between the toxin and other foreign substances.

The chapter describes the phases of action of toxin in living cells. It discusses the recognition of relationship existing between toxin and other effectors.